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China 16, U.s. 7, Donald Payne 5, America 3, Us 3, London 3, Kosovo 3, Mexico 3, Obama 2, John D. 2, Barack Obama 2, Newman 2, Catherine T. Macarthur 2, Nelson 2, Edward Woodward 2, Sarah Palin 2, Kcet 2, Honolulu 2, New York 2, Rome 2,
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  WHUT    BBC World News    News/Business.  
   International issues. (CC)  

    November 16, 2009
    6:30 - 6:59pm EST  

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>> "bbc world news" is presented by kcet, los angeles. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. the newman's own foundation.
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the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> barack obama says the u.s. and china can cooperate, but he delivers an uncomfortable message, too, about free speech. on patrol with the police in mexico as the drug a situation
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has its deadliest days. and we may need to triple aid to our culture. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later for you -- [banjo plays] on the road again, this time to deliver her memoirs. but there -- but is there more to just -- to this than just plugging a book? and at an exhibit with an important message. ♪ president obama's visit to china is arguably his most significant official trip yet. a day into it, he has stressed again that the u.s. and china
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and need not be adversaries, that the world would benefit from their cooperation. and in a town hall style event live on tv, he told chinese students that free-speech is a universal right. when he died with china's president -- president -- when he dined with china's president, his message was more diplomatic. >> he is here to say welcome to the rise of a new power in the east, barack obama wants china as a partner, not our arrival. -- not a rival. today, he took a message to china, something that china -- he took his message to the chinese people, something that china's leaders never do. the white house wanted id shown live on television nationwide. it was not. president obama kept any criticism of china muted. >> we do not seek to oppose any system -- to impose any system of government on any other nation.
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freedom of expression and worship and access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights and should be available to all people. >> as obama was speaking, we were trying to talk to the wife of your show. -- of this man, detained in your car after calling for greater freedoms. he is still under arrest. >> president obama will not press human rights issues in earnest because during this internet is more uncertain. >> president obama will tread carefully, well aware his communist hosts are more comfortable flaunting their strength and listening to criticism -- and then listening to criticism. >> america's relationship with china is perhaps the most
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important of any relationship in the world now. some say he is muting his criticism on human-rights because of this. mr. obama says few global challenges can be solved if america and china do not work together. china sti seems hesitant about how to respond to his embrace. >> this past weekend saw one of the deadliest days in one of the world's most dangerous cities. 15 people were killed in the northern mexican city of juarez as the latest -- city of juarez. as the latest murders happened, bbc was with the border police. they may find some of this report disturbing. >> the 6:00 p.m. and already on alert in mexico's deadliest city. we have been driving only a few minutes when the first murder happened. the police found him on a dusty
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side street in tidy car. -- in a tattered car. the latest victim of mexico's drug wars. and beside him, a child, who has now seen more than anyone ever showed. -- ever showed. they looked for clues, trampling all over the crime scene. they do not solve many murders here. and watching nearby, a family. >> who was the man? >> my husband. >> and can you tell us what happened? >> i do not know. he was working in the car, in the window and [unintelligible] >> but there was worse to come.
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>> we have been out with the police for less than an hour and already we are being taken to the scene of another shooting, the second person killed here in war as this evening. >> in fact, it was two more. first, they killed the driver, a passenger tried to escape, dragging himself along the car. then, we were told, he was shot in the head. it passing priest stopped to administer the last ris. then as the crowd watched, a man came to identify the victim, his grandson, just seven years old. this is what the beginning were as a -- what living in juarez now means for many. he was a good boy, they told us,
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one of 15 people murdered that day in a city where more than 2000 have been killed this year. as his relatives gathered to mourn it was impossible to know whether his father had been involved in the drug trade. but with these drugs along with poverty and widespread political -- but it is these drugs along with party and widespread political corruption that is destroying places like tis and so far, authorities have been unable to protect people. >> let's bring you up to -- to date on the other main news. the international atomic agency as saying that iran's delayed declaration that it has a second nuclear plant raises concern that it could be concealing other sites. ey are concerned about the qom site's history and purpose. it raises a host of other
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questions about nuclear secrets. gordon brown has offered to host and a clear conference in afghanistan next year -- offer to host a nuclear conference on afghanistan next year in london. the italian prime minister has gone on trial for alleged fraud in the lawn, but the case was adjourned until january of next year. he is accused of tax fraud and false accounting to -- related to the purchase the rights to his television broadcast company. a three-day food summit has begun in rome with a warning from the u.n. that of rising world hunger is tobe tackled, wealthier nations must triple the aid earmarked for agriculture. and a new report from save the children urges world leaders to give children's malnutrition a fire hart -- far higher priority. >> action district hospital in northern afghanistan, the face
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of malnutrition. although he is nearly six months old, he was brought in weighi less than a newborn. and with diarrhea making things worse, his chances were considered slim. the treatment he is to receive help him put on half a kilo and doctors say he should make a full recovery. this is one of the parts of the world where malnutrition remains a stubborn problem, particularly in children. the global picture, more than 3 million children die every year from malnutrition and related causes. stunting children not growing to the height they should because of chronic malnutrition affects 178 million children in developing countries. the thinness as a suitor with acute malnutrition the affects of 55 million children, 10% of
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the undefined. >> it is equally important that the families can afford the food that they can go to the market and buy enough food to feed their families. for that, they need cash support, social protection, and that is what the leaders at the summit need to grasp. >> the save the children are proposing a plan of action in the eight countries where 50% of the world's malnourished children lived at an estimated cost of just under $9 billion per year. but other campaigners, too, are arguing that the sun and needs to ensure that the higher priority is given to attacking trautman -- child malnutrition. the crisis is still there on food prices, evident at the with the prices have stayed higher in this small pakistani province. inflation is going up, he says,
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and the price of lentils is higher because there are poor people that they cannot afford them. and that underlines the summit in rome, the press and chales facing farmers and consumers alike. >> the death of an iraqi hotel receptionist in british military customer -- custody from 93 separate injuries has raised questions about the treatment of detainees. today, a public inquiry into the death six years ago led to the first conviction of a british soldier. this may be related to another serious incident. >> captured on camera, donald payne with a detainee, being subjected to stress positions men to have been banned.
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but this, he says was standard operation procedure. this 26-year-old hotel receptionist had 93 separate injuries when he died. at one point, his father left room in tears. donald payne, who we cannot identify today, told the inquiry that he was not the only man involved, but all units guarding the detainees. the commander had kicked and punched them. and with one detainee, he rs plays a can ofd left and a petrol in front of the envoy. he poud water over him and then lit a match. -- in front of the young boy. he poured water over him and then lit a match. it was in here that the fatal blows were struck. donald payne denies that he smashed his head against a wall.
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so, who is responsible for what happened in here? >> many people have been responsible for what went wrong from the very senior level to the low level. mr. payne was at a relatively low level. he has some responsibility, but by no means all of it. the crux donald payne claims -- >> donald payne claims that his commanding officer of, who was cleared of any wrongdoing in a court-martial, was in general gung-ho and trigger happy. he said he once watched him interrogate a prisoner about weapons. the prisoner did not reply and the c o cocked his pistol and said he was going to blow his face off. >> there were 30 other allegations of abuse, to which the rockies want a public inquiry.
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h>> still to come, a successful poll, but no clear winner, we have the latest from kosovo. first, though, the actor edward woodward has died at a 79. he had been suffering from pneumonia. he began as a shakespearean actor, but was probably best known as his role in the triggerman and in the television role of " the equalizer." >> one of his best roles, the corfam the wicker man about a scottish police officer -- the scotchtown film the wicker man about a scottish police officer
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searching foa missing girl. he enjoyed a long film career. he took on one of its most successful tv roles in of an " the equalizer" for which he won a golden globe. he had a heart attack and a quick recovery and was soon back at work. his character was a former spiey turned the gun for hire. but he says it was not about vigilante is in. -- ms. chelan to some. -- it was not about a vigilant ism. >> there was a feeling, here is a guy who will not let people get kicked around. >> edward woodward was given the tough obe and night -- was given bthe obe in 1978. >> theemocracy leader in
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burma, on santucci, has called for a meeting with the head of the military government. she said she wishes to cooperate with the government on issues that will benefit the nation. just briefly, venezuelas president, hincker chavez, has asked cuba's president to help with a chronic drought.
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>> on his first visit to beijing, president obama said the u.s. and china can cooperate, but he stressed there should be less internets center ship and more free speech. -- internet censorship and more free speech. the u.s. space shuttle launch from cape canaveral in florida. >> 3, 2, 1, 0, and lift off. >> the astronauts are recording atlantis carrying around 1 million microscopic worms, in an experiment that is supposed to have implications to humans. the worms will be this -- will be used to test for ways to prevent muscle atrophy.
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a former u.s. -- the former u.s. vice presidential candidate sarah palin is back on the road, but not campaigning officially. she is promoting her memoir, which is generating huge interest in america. is this just a book tour? >> it could be another lauh pad. there is that feeling. it is already a best seller. but are we also witnessing a dry run for 2012? a run for the white house? it could be an attempt to bring back pailin-mania. she was seen as a breath of fresh air last year. everybody wanted to know every single detail about her. just to remind you briefly of the power of the pailin phenomena and, weave put together some scenes.
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>> i will be honored to accept your nomination for vice president of the united states. >> they say the difference between a hockey mom and a pit bull is lipstick. >> this is nicholas sarkozy speaking. how are you? >> it is so good, it is so good to hear your. thank you for calling us. >> it is a pleasure. >> cannot predict what the next fish run is going to look like. i certainly cannot predict what is going to happen in a couple of years. i will be in charge of the turkeys. >> at least a flavor of the pailin phenomenon. is she really seen as a credible candidate for the white house? >> if you look at the latest poll run by the washington post and abc news, they've found they
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asked -- of those they asked about 53% said they would not consider voting for her for the white house. however, if you look at those who call themselves republicans, she had an impressive rating, 76% said they viewed as a credible candidate. there is a huge amount of enthusiasm generated for her. she is clearly a stand out political personality and she has charisma. people want to see where she is doing. is she a credible political leader? she has very pronounced conservative views, is she someone that can reach out in the way that barack obama did last year? >> is she good news for the republican party or good news for barack obama? >> it depends on which republicans who are asking, really. there are those who say that she completely chimes with the times. in a arhen government has
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grown massively and this talk of pumping huge amount of health care and that means a growi deficit and higher taxes, there is that backlash with people saying, small government or less government is a good thing. she really * in on that. on cultural issues she is there. on the other hand, there are those who want to reach out and not box themselves into a corner. those of that persuasion feel it could be a disaster if they go down the sarah palin road. >> early results from kosovo's elections suggest most of the contest will go to a runoff on candidates backed by the prime minister. the main opposition party won four.
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>> the positive mood in the national press after kosovo cozy first election as an independent state. headlines read "everybody wins." this one called it "a festus sunday." many see -- a festive sunday many see this as a victory. jim >> [unintelligible] >> perhaps the most significant aspect was turnout among the serb minority. this time, for some serbs of these, the call by the serbian government to stay at home fell on deaf ears, a fact acknowledged by many albanians here. >> we expected changes and i think that we have reached that
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goal, god willing. in the first part, minorities also took part, especially the serb minorities. >> this was no doubt that the of all casaubon's, the prime minister. his tdk party won in the majority when the results were declared. a runoff poll will now take place in december to determine the winner. there was a generally positive assessment by the election here. there was relief that the fears of widespread fraud was unfounded. and so, this young government appears in many ways to have cost half a crucial test.
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it is one edging forward ever so slowly. >> the trees from a tropical forest appeared overnight around trafalgar square in central london, placed there to highlight the climate change. -- the effect of climate change. the artist to prep them over is speaking to the bbc correspondent. >> it is called "coast forest" and these trees have been brught from africa to london's trafalgar square to make a point. they're here to celebrate the efforts being made in ghana to halt the afforestation. -- to halt deforestation. >> at 20 feet across its base, it weighs 20 tons and had to be
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a tumble through the chorus in ghana and shipped to trafalgar square. >> it was here that this project began. most of the trees fell naturally and it was the artist, angela palmer, who had the idea of shipping the stumps to europe. >> i wanted to provoke contemplation and reflection on the rain forest and deforestation and what is happening in the plan appeared i think that how it is our work -- it is our work and we have to get the message across of scientific data. quite often, they are dry statistics and people have had so much of it. to see something visually like this could have real impact. >> transporting huge and the regular art objects has been more than challenging. and remember, they were just some spirit before, they were as tall as nelson's column. -- they were just trees.
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before, they were as tall as nelson's column. this journey is not over yet. after trafalgar square, they will be sent off to copenhagen for the forthcoming climate conference in december. >> before we go, a reminder of the main news at the start of this first state visit to china. president obama said the u.s. and china need not be adversaries and the world would benefit if we could cooperate. he said freedom of expression, religious freedom and free information were universal rights that should be available to all. thanks for being with us. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. the newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. ♪
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>> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> i'm julia stiles. >> i'm kevin bacon. >> i'm kim cattrall. >> hi, i'm ken burns. >> i'm lili taylor. >> i'm henry louis gates, jr., and public broadcasting is my source for news about the world. >> for intelligent conversation. >> for election coverage you can count on. >> for conversations beyond the sound bites. >> a commitment to journalism. >> for deciding who to vote for. >> i'm kerry washington, and public broadcasting is my source for intelligent connections to my community. >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
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